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Back To The Old Stompin’ Grounds
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There is something surreal about heading back to the place where I studied as a furniture designer and woodworker. Rosewood Studio brings back a lot of memories for me. I spent many hours learning, screwing up, and making mistakes at the school which is probably why it feels weird for me to return as an instructor. I have taught at many places around the globe but this space is different. I cut my teeth here as a woodworker under the tutelage of Ron Barter and continued to learn from him (and others) when I returned as a Craftsman in Residence. 

Ron and Mary Anne have invited me back on the 9th of April to teach, what I feel, is one of the most important classes they offer. The Excellence with Hand Tools course is where it all begins and for good reason. Students learn fundamental skills like sharpening, basic hand tool use and wood technology. Hands-on skills like creating the ‘Perfect Board’ (a board made 6-square with only planes) and through dovetails are where the week leads, not to mention learning what sharp is and the importance of achieving it.

So if you’ve never been to Rosewood Studio or taken a class with me, why not kill two birds with one stone. Or better yet, don’t kill anything and come take the class. As always, a class with me will be a barrel of monkeys and you’re guaranteed to learn, laugh and have a good time.

To understand, you must do - V

Vic TesolinComment
What are ye at?

As my East coast buddies would say, "What are ye at"? Over the last six months I've, sent a young lady off to university, worked on a ton of articles for various publications and been on many trips around the world. It hasn't left me much time for this blog.  There isn't much sign of slowing down and in fact it seems like things might be ramping up. 

I have a few books that I'm working on and I'm also looking at some other extra curricular activities that should keep me off the streets for a few years. I'm also going to be doing some teaching at Rosewood Studio and Marc Adams School of Woodworking but more on those in a bit. I also want to do more blog writing so here's to that!!

So thanks for your patience with me and you should be seeing more of me in the future months.
 - Vic

Vic Tesolin Comment
Remember me?

Hey there! Remember me? I'm Vic...the guy who is supposed to maintain this blog and website. It's been awhile and I have no good excuses tother than being busy with magazine articles and a few book contracts. Not to mention a bunch of work travel and teaching. I'll stop moaning now and encourage you to check out the Events & Classes page to see where I'll be next. 

There are also some very cool projects that I'm involved with at the moment but have been sworn to secrecy so you'll just have to wait. Thanks for your patience with me...I can be a bit of a fart in a wind storm.

To understand, you must do. - V

Vic Tesolin Comments
The Great Canadian Rust Junkie Fest

Things are cranking up pretty hard here in the Ottawa area for a couple of reasons. The obvious one is the celebration of Canada's 150th birthday. The other event that should be obvious to woodworkers is The Great Canadian Rust Junkie Fest. If you've never been, then you need to be there.  The event started out with a focus on old English heavy metal but every year the event includes more and more.

Before....

Before....

....after.

....after.

Big machines being unearthed from their holes and brought back to life. The man behind this event is Jack Forsberg. When he's not running a successful heritage millwork business he is tinkering away on old machines, getting them up and running so they can be put back to work for his business.

The Wadkin Temple

The Wadkin Temple

It all takes place at what has been coined 'The Wadkin Temple' and the event has been going on annually for 5 years now. Jack loves getting like minded people together to share what they know and what they do. 

The Rust Fest initially started five years ago after the American model called "Arnfest" The idea was to have a more Canadian model and one that promoted vintage machinery and vintage woodworking techniques. I initially announced the idea on the Canadian woodworking forum. My intentions were for a gathering and approximately 35 people came the first year . It has slowly evolved into what I would like to refer as the Sturgis Falls event for woodwork and more Carnival with people showing their unique tools or customized creations. It is most certainly a celebration of quality in every aspect. The theme of the temple is a play on the worship we have with our tools and brands. Junkies are actually part of the clergy. We have for the first time this year"Holy Wadkin Lubricating Oil" for those not yet baptized. My hope for the future is that the"Wadkin Temple" becomes a craft center for those of us pursuing woodworking - either professionally or passionately, or in my case both . A place anyone in all the world interested in the woodworking would have to come and see. The annual celebration being a return to Mecca . The holy ground of woodworking.    - Jack

This year Jack has invited me to lead the charge into the hand-tool world of woodworking for the event and I must say I'm pretty excited. While there, I will be demonstrating the use of hand tools while making a Moxon-style vise for my shop. The hardware I will be using is quite unique and will also be making it's debut at Rust Junkie Fest. I'll be just one of many volunteers who help out to make the event a success. 

There will also be blacksmithing demos going on, demos on rehabbing machines, a BBQ and later a bonfire with music and likely a fair amount of BEvERage's. Visit the site for more info and to register...also, did I mention that it's all FREE! You can even pitch a tent Saturday night and watch the sun come up on Sunday. We hope to see you there.

In order to understand, you must do. - V

Vic Tesolin Comments
Old English Heavy Metal

In this case, not Iron Maiden but you can fine them in my vinyl stack in the shop too.

One of the cool things about getting a larger space is I can start to fill it. While I still have no need for a table saw, having a power jointer again would be nice. Now some of you may remember hearing me say that most jointers that are on the market today are too small. I mean ... how are you supposed to flatten a 12" wide board with a 6" jointer? My solution? Buy a 12" jointer!

12" of wood flattening heavy metal

12" of wood flattening heavy metal

I don't have the year this old fella was made but I'm sure I will once Jack Forsberg is through with me. He assures me that this is going to be an involved restoration but I'm looking forward to getting my hands dirty. My friend Karen has been through the old tool refurb deal in her shop so I'm sure with these two in my corner I won't get into too much trouble. 

A time before crumby stickers

A time before crumby stickers

I will be doing a full restoration including all things that whir and cut, down to the paint and aesthetics. If any one sees (or has) any cool vintage start/stop buttons, let me know.

And then there is this tall fella.

Would you look at the lines on the hood

Would you look at the lines on the hood

This is a Buffalo 18  drill press - a serious drilling machine and I'm looking forward to getting it cleaned up and running. The press promises to be less work than the jointer but as Jack has warned me, you never know what you'll find one you start taking things apart. This Buffalo is a Canadian made machine from Kitchener, Ontario.

These tools were designed for pattern makers and machinists respectively, a discerning group if there ever was one. There is a bit of work in this heavy metal game but it will be worth every minute when I eventually work with tools that were bred for accuracy.

In order to understand, you must do. - V